Rachel Hillman Foy - Hillman Homes



Posted by Rachel Hillman Foy on 10/17/2018

When you’re selling your home, things can get really busy, really fast. You want your home to be in tip top shape to give it the best chance of selling in a timely manner. There are a few things you can do in a short time frame that allows you to spruce up your home without breaking a sweat. Below, you’ll find some tips to help you bring your home to another level of wow before the open house. 


Check Your Front Door


All you really need to do is put a fresh coat of paint on your front door to brighten the look of your entryway. There’s something about a freshly painted front door that really makes a home look like new. 


Spruce Up The Landscaping


You can really do a minimal amount in your yard and make your home curb-appeal ready. Just rake some leaves, add some mulch, mow the lawn, and voila. It might be an all day project, but in the end, it will be worth it. As long as people have a good view and feel that your yard has been taken care of, the outside of your home is in the clear for an open house.  


Check The Outdoor Lights


Even though an open house will be happening in the daylight hours, people may be curious that there is adequate lighting on the outside of your home. Buyers can either check this while they are at the open house or they could go a step further and drive by the property at night. Adequate lighting allows for a sense of security and safety all throughout the outside of the property.  


Care For The Mailbox


Few places in your home are as neglected as the mailbox is. Add some fresh paint to your mailbox. You can use the same color as your front door for consistency. At the very least, clean up the mailbox to give it a better appearance. Make sure your house number is present somewhere on the box as well. This helps the property to have a sense of being a bit more inviting. People will also be able to find your home easier. 


Make Use Of Flowers


You should place flowers around your home on the day of the open house. Add a fresh cut bouquet to the kitchen table. Bring some potted plants and florals around your entryway. These simple touches really can make an impression when potential buyers visit your home. 


Remove Your Personal Stuff

From the outside in, traces of your life in the home should be put away. This means pet items, toys, games, photos, and celebrity shrines. The more free space a buyer has to envision themselves living in the home, the better.          


With these small extra touches, your open house is bound to be a success!




Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Rachel Hillman Foy on 10/10/2018

If you've lived in your home for more than a couple years, chances are you've grown rather attached to it. Whether you're selling your house because your family has outgrown it or your company has transferred you to another location, you're probably attaching a lot of sentimental value to the price tag. Unfortunately, sentimental value does not translate into dollars and cents in today's real estate market.

The emotions of prospective buyers will often play a role in their decision to make on offer on your house, but they're probably not going to pay more than the market value for your property -- unless there's a bidding war situation going on. One of the best ways to determine a fair and reasonable asking price for your home is to have it appraised by an experienced real estate agent. Their appraisal will be based on objective data, such as the selling price of comparable homes in your area. The location and condition of your home will have a bearing on pricing your home effectively, as will the prevailing market conditions and other factors. Although online estimates can sometimes give you a ballpark figure of what your house may be worth, a local appraisal is more accurate

A common misconception among homeowners is that a $10,000 home improvement expenditure should justify a $10,000 increase in the selling price of a home. Although that concept may seem logical, it unfortunately doesn't work that way in the real estate market. An updated kitchen, bathroom, or roof may make your house more appealing to prospective buyers and help it sell faster, but it probably won't have a dollar-for-dollar impact on the price buyers would be willing to pay. Since each selling situation is unique, however, your local real estate agent is the best person to consult regarding a fair asking price for your home.

Avoiding Home Seller Mistakes

In addition to overpricing their home, another mistake home sellers make involves three related activities: decorating, staging, and attempting to create curb appeal. In spite of a homeowner's best intentions, their decorating and home staging ideas may clash with those of the house-buying public. When you attempt to tackle home staging on your own, several things could go wrong.

  • You could either spend too much or too little on making repairs and sprucing up your home's appearance.
  • You could spend your time and money upgrading inconsequential features of your home, while overlooking the real important changes that need to be made.
In either case, you're missing the mark when it comes to maximizing the marketability of your home. That's why it pays to take advantage of the knowledge, expertise, and objectivity of a professional real estate agent. Their recommendations on pricing and home staging will be based on experience, best practices, objective criteria, and current market conditions.





Posted by Rachel Hillman Foy on 10/3/2018

Planning to sell your house in the next few weeks or months? If so, you likely will want to declutter to improve your house's appearance and make it easy for potential homebuyers to envision what life might be like if they purchase your residence.

Ultimately, donating items may prove to be exceedingly valuable, particularly for those who want to declutter and move in the near future.

By donating items that you no longer need, you can quickly and easily remove clutter from your residence. Plus, you may be able to secure a tax credit for your charitable contributions.

Before you donate your items, however, you should take a close look at your personal belongings and decide which things to keep and which to give to charity.

Now, let's take a look at three items that you can donate to charity:

1. Clothing

If you intend to move from Florida to Alaska – or vice-versa – there may be a wide range of clothing that you can donate before you move.

Ensure that any clothing that you plan to donate is clean. If necessary, wash any dresses, t-shirts and other apparel that you intend to donate.

Also, it is always better to err on the side of caution when you donate clothing. And if you have clothes that are faded or torn, you should dispose of these items.

2. Electronics

For those who plan to downsize, donating electronics is ideal. That way, you can get rid of electronics that won't fit into your new home and do a good deed at the same time.

Evaluate your electronics and make sure they work correctly before you donate them. In addition, it often pays to tape any electronics cords, wires and accessories to the items themselves.

Check out a charity's electronics donations policies prior to scheduling a donation pick-up too. By doing so, you can guarantee that a charity can pick up and use your excess electronics.

3. Appliances

In many instances, an individual may move into a new address that comes equipped with a new refrigerator, washer, dryer and other appliances. If this happens, you may want to contact local charities to see if they can pick up your current appliances.

Reach out to a local charity to find out whether it can pick up your current appliances – you'll be glad you did. If the answer is "Yes," you may be able to avoid having to move big, heavy appliances on your own.

As the aforementioned list shows, there are lots of great items that you can donate to charity. Conduct an in-depth search of charities in your city or town, and you can work with a local charity that can use your excess items.

Lastly, if you ever have questions about which charities in your area will accept donations, don't hesitate to reach out to these organizations directly. And if you're looking for extra assistance as you declutter your residence and prepare to list your home, it certainly helps to contact an expert real estate agent as well.




Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Rachel Hillman Foy on 9/26/2018

Fall might arguably be everyone’s favorite season—regardless of where you live. In New England, the weather becomes full of days with unpredictable forecasts of warm and cool days with crisp breezes, the more frequent rain showers and the leaves turning to beautiful hues of red, purple,orange, and yellow. It’s a scene that no New Englander ever takes for granted.And with the new season comes new décor. Check out these tips and tricks for fun and creative ways to decorate your home with for fall with pumpkins.

Paint: Paint is an easy go-to when you want to do something different with your pumpkins. You can go simple by painting all one color or you can grab some stencils and try out a floral look. These simple designs would be a nice idea to compliment your other fall decorations.

Glitter: Whether you want to go all out and coat your entire pumpkin in glitter, create designs from stencils with glitter or make a simple polka dot covered pumpkin, you can never go wrong with glitter—and there’s never too much of it either.

Cut outs/Craft Materials: There are a multitude of craft materials and cutouts that can be used in creative ways with pumpkins. Turn your pumpkin into an owl with some googley eyes and some brown and tan craft paper or go simple and create a jack-o-lantern without all the mess.

Stack ‘Em: For a unique approach to decorating pumpkins,considering stacking them. You could turn your pumpkins into a snowman (if you are eager for the holidays), an owl, or even create a message with a letter or short phrase on each pumpkin.

Permanent Marker: Use permanent market to create decorative designs or write words/phrases. Darker colors work best on orange pumpkins. You might be able to get away with a few lighter colors on the white pumpkins. You can use stencils or go with the free hand—if you’re risky.

Washi Tape: Washi tape is all the craze in the creative world. It comes in so many colors and designs. It’s a great addition to almost any DIY project. Use the tape as is or cut into cute designs or little dots fora polka dot pumpkin.

Most of these ideas are simple and can be completed in just a couple of hours. And they are great for families, friends, or a day of DIYing with yourself. You can get all the items described above at your local craft store and be sure to be on the lookout for coupons to make this project even less expensive.

So now that you’ve decorated your home for fall with your creative pumpkin crafting, go on and get out there and enjoy the season. There’s plenty of apple picking, pumpkin picking, fall festivals, and family time to be enjoying.




Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Rachel Hillman Foy on 9/19/2018

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Although basements can be extremely useful, in terms of providing storage space and work area, many homeowners don't take full advantage of it.

Sooner or later, the following statement applies to nearly everone: Unless an organizing system is put into place -- preferably within the first year of moving in -- your basement will begin to take on the appearance of a junk repository!

When your belongings are haphazardly heaped together, it not only becomes difficult to find things you want and need, but items you've cast aside gradually occupy more and more of your valuable space.

The ideal scenario -- from a storage standpoint -- is to buy a house that already comes with built-in shelving and cabinets in the basement. A feature that's almost as good is when the previous owner took the time to set up (and leave for you) enough metal shelving in the basement to meet your storage needs. Although metal shelving doesn't have a lot of eye appeal, it is extremely sturdy and functional.

Cost Effective Solutions

If aesthetics and functionality are what you're looking for, consider these ideas: 1) picking up bargains on shelving, cabinets, and other cheap furniture at garage sales. 2) hiring a reasonably priced carpenter to custom-build some nice shelving and cabinets in your basement.

Of course, if you happen to be handy with a hammer and saw, yourself, then building your own storage shelves might be a satisfying (and money saving) weekend project. However, if your carpentry skills are a bit on the "marginal" side, it would probably be worth it to find a reasonably priced and competent craftsman! Asking friends, relatives, and neighbors for recommendations can often yield the name of the perfect -- and often affordable -- person for the job.

Basement Organizing Tips

Once your shelving is in place, you might want to purchase some inexpensive bins, baskets, or boxes to neatly store you belongings, seasonal supplies, and items you're not exactly sure what to do with. Labeling all containers will improve efficiency and help you avoid frustration down the road.

Designating a section of your basement for hand-me-downs, future garage sale items, and/or charitable donations will make it easier to categorize and move things out when the time comes. Another aspect of keeping your basement organized and free of clutter is to consider throwing away items that are obsolete, irreparably broken, damaged, or incomplete. While "one man's junk is another man's treasure", some things are simply of no value to anyone! For items that fall into that category, the choice usually boils down to one of three options: restore it, recycle it, or have it professionally disposed of.

A well organized basement can potentially be a good place to store things you want to save, protect, and keep in good condition for future use. Preserving anything that's delicate, valuable, or easily damaged requires a lot of safeguards, including -- but not limited to -- keeping them adequately covered, sometimes in airtight containers, and maintaining a dry, climate-controlled environment. Relatively humidity should be carefully monitored and, in most cases, maintained between 30% and 50%. When moisture in the air approaches 60%, mold and mildew tend to thrive.







Rachel Hillman Foy